7 Tips for Sharing a Kitchen with Roommates

sharing a kitchen with roommates

Many of the issues related to roommate problems involve the kitchen. Roommates are easily agitated when others don’t clean their dishes, eat their food, and ignore basic cleanliness. Getting along with a roommate in the kitchen will help you get along in other areas of the house. Sharing a kitchen is stressful, but if you follow these kitchen tips, you should have no problems.

1. Decide What the Kitchen Needs

Roommates can co-exist in the kitchen by determining what they need. Depending on the number of roommates, each roommate can be in charge of a specific dish, such as bowls or utensils. This will help fill the kitchen at a fraction of the ordinary cost. Roommates can discuss their kitchen needs, and then volunteer to buy what they needs.

2. Share Groceries

Roommates should definitely not share all of their food. However, splitting bulk items and items that expire quickly will help free up space in the kitchen. Roommates should consider sharing items such as milk, eggs, bread, and more. You could designate which roommate will buy the basic items each week. This helps reduce the cost of food, and it ensures you’ll use the food by the expiration date.

3. Clean Up After Yourself

Does this even need to be said?

Cleaning up after oneself is a basic way to keep the peace with your roommates. In regards to the kitchen, make sure you always clean up your mess. More specifically, do your dishes. Don’t leave them sitting in the sink for weeks. This is one of the top reasons people fight with their roommate. Just clean them after you’re done using them. It will save you many roommates fights.

4. Create a Cleaning Schedule

Make a simple cleaning schedule for each day. One person can be in charge of wiping the counters on Monday, whereas another can be in charge of sweeping the floor. This will help keep the kitchen clean, but it also shouldn’t take too much time. The task should take no longer than 5-10 minutes. If each person does their task, the kitchen will always be sparkly clean.

5. Make Dinner

One of the greatest advantages to having a lot of roommates is dinner. Organize a weekly schedule based on when each person works. If you have five roommates, each of you can make dinner one day a week. The other two days can be reserved for leftovers and takeout. This will help roommates bond and always have a delicious, home-cooked dinner.

6. Get a “We Need” Board

Get a white board for the fridge to list items that the kitchen needs. If you run out of paper towels, write in on the board. Then whoever goes to the store next can quickly grab what is listed on the board. This is a great idea, but make sure one person isn’t always the one to get the needed items. This could cause arguments and annoyance.

If you’re having issues in the kitchen, let your roommates know. If you’re having roommates in the kitchen, listen to them. Communication is the key to any relationship.

7. Eat Your Own Food

Another thing that doesn’t need to be stated, but we’re going to say anyway.

DON’T EAT YOUR ROOMMATE’S FOOD WITHOUT ASKING.

As a general rule of thumb, just eat what you bought. If you’re really craving something your roommate has, ask them. If they say no, don’t be offended. Go buy the same item, and maybe you guys can organize a plan in the future to buy the product together.


Meeting your roommates basic kitchen needs is necessary to getting along. These tips will help organize an efficient and friendly kitchen. Remember to respect your roommate. If you’re ever unsure if something is okay, just consider what you would want your roommate to do for you.

Read more about how to manage roommate relationships here: https://moderncoliving.com/2020/05/12/how-to-manage-your-relationship-with-your-roommates-during-the-covid-19-lockdown/

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